How Long Will Food Stay Good In a Freezer Without Power?

If you’ve ever wondered how long your food will stay good in a freezer without power, then this blog post is for you. We’ll go over some of the factors that affect food spoilage and give you some guidelines to follow.

Checkout this video:

Introduction

If your freezer ever goes without power, either due to a power outage or other emergency, it’s important to know how long food will stay good. Frozen food can be safe to eat if it has been kept at a constant temperature of 0°F or below. However, if the freezer is not working properly, or if the door has been opened frequently, food may not stay frozen for as long. The following is a guide to help you determine how long food will stay good in a freezer without power.

What is the Shelf Life of Food in a Freezer Without Power

All perishable food in the freezer should be thrown out if the power has been out for more than 24 hours. Food starts to thaw once the power goes out and will quickly spoil once it reaches 40°F. If you can keep the door closed, your food will stay cold for up to 48 hours. After that, it is unsafe to eat.

How to Maximize the Shelf Life of Food in a Freezer Without Power

How long will food stay good in a freezer without power? The answer depends on how well the freezer was insulated and how cold it was when the power outage occurred. A full freezer will hold its temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if half-full). If food has thawed and refrozen during a power outage, it is still safe to eat if it remained cold (40°F or below). To be on the safe side, though, it’s best to discard any food that has thawed and refrozen.

How to Tell if Food in a Freezer Without Power is Still Good

If you’ve ever lost power at home for more than a few hours, you may have wondered whether the food in your freezer is still safe to eat. Here’s a guide to help you tell if food in a freezer without power is still good.

In general, food in a freezer without power will be safe to eat for up to four hours. This is assuming that the freezer door remains closed; if the door is opened frequently, the food will start to thaw and will only be good for two hours.

Now, what if the power is out for more than four hours? If the freezer temperature gets above 40 degrees Fahrenheit, the food inside should be considered unsafe and should be thrown away.

If you’re not sure whether the food in your freezer is still safe, it’s always better to err on the side of caution and throw it away.

What to Do With Food in a Freezer Without Power

If the power is out for less than 2 hours, food in your freezer will probably be okay. Keep the freezer door closed as much as possible to maintain the cold temperature.

If the power is out for more than a couple of hours, start using dry or block ice to keep your freezer as cold as possible. Fifty pounds of dry ice should hold a full 18-cubic-foot freezer for 2 days.

If you haveelectricity but your freezer isn’t working, keep food in it frozen. (To find out whether it’s working, use an appliance thermometer; if the freezer temperature is 40°F or lower, it’s working.) You can keep food frozen in coolers with dry ice or block ice. A fully packed cooler will hold food safely for 2 days without dry ice; add 1 pound of dry ice per day for each additional day you need to keep food cold.

How to Prevent Food in a Freezer Without Power from Going Bad

If your freezer ever stops working, don’t panic! There are ways to prevent food in a freezer without power from going bad.

First and foremost, keep the freezer door closed as much as possible. This will help maintain the temperature inside and prevent warm air from coming in. If possible, prop open the door with a book or other object to allow some circulation.

Next, try to keep the temperature inside the freezer as cool as possible. Use ice packs or bags of ice to help keep things cold. If you have power, you can also use a fan to circulate cold air.

Finally, if you know that the power is going to be out for a while, you can consider transferring food to a cooler or another refrigerator. This is especially important for perishable items like meat and dairy products.

With these tips, you can rest assured that your food will stay fresh until power is restored!

Conclusion

In general, frozen food will keep for two days without power if it is properly wrapped. With dry ice, it can last for up to three days. If you have a full freezer, it will take longer for the food to thaw and become unsafe to eat. A full freezer can keep food safe for up to 48 hours, while a half-full freezer will only last for 24 hours.

FAQ

It’s a question we all dread: the power goes out unexpectedly, and the food in our freezer starts to thaw. How long will it be safe to eat?

There is no easy answer, as it depends on several factors, such as the type of food, the temperature of the freezer, and how full the freezer is. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers these general guidelines:

· A full freezer will keep the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full and the door remains closed).
· An unopened refrigerator will keep foods cold for about 4 hours.
· Refrigerated perishable foods should not exceed 40° F for more than 2 hours.
· A full freezer should keep an ice cream frozen for 2 days.
· If you packed cooked foods in a dry-ice chest, they will stay frozen up to 2 days.
If you need to store food for longer than these suggested times, you can use a generator to keep your refrigerator and freezer running until power is restored.

Resources

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides guidance on how long food will stay good in a freezer without power. The following are some common scenarios:

If the freezer is full, food will usually stay frozen for two days.

If the freezer is half full, food will usually stay frozen for one day.

If the freezer is only a quarter full, food will usually stay frozen for only six to nine hours.

Keep in mind that these are only guidelines, and actual times may vary depending on factors such as the type of food being stored, the temperature of the freezer, and how often the door is opened.

About the Author

Linda Larsen is a journalist, quick meal preparation expert and mother of three. Her passion for family meals led her to start Easy Family Meals in 2009, where she shares her knowledge of food shortcuts and tips to make mealtime easier.

Larsen has a degree in dietetics from South Dakota State University and completed her dietetic internship at the United States Air Force Academy.

Scroll to Top